scattered reflections

it's a big neat disordered world out there

28 notes

203 Plays
Karl Jenkins
Benedictus

Benedictus, Karl Jenkins, The Armed Man: A Mass for Peace

     Stillness.
     There was a point in time, some interminable and indefinable period that lasted somewhere between an instant and eternity, when everything in the city seemed to fall still at the exact same time.  Mamoru had pulled enough all-nighters to know about this peculiar lapse in the heartbeat of the metropolis, which seemed to always begin just before dawn.  He was in it now, and he closed his eyes and relished the sensation.  Even the wind had fallen still.
     Perhaps part of its beauty was that so few people seemed to recognize the moment, or perhaps its fleeting nature was what made it so precious.  Nonetheless, Mamoru had always enjoyed revelling in that almost mystic stillness; in those moments, it was as if he could feel a bond to the city, even the world, around him.  He wondered if it had been that way in the past, when he’d actually been prince of this entire world.  Had he ever taken time back then to close his eyes and feel his world?  He wasn’t certain, but it seemed to him that he had not.
     A pity.
     “Pivlionta,” a voice murmured behind him.  Mamoru didn’t bother to glance up.
     “Bless you,” he said.
     Yusaku laughed.  “It’s an old Reinan word,” his partner explained, propping his elbows on the railing beside Mamoru and gazing off the edge of the roof.  “It refers to the point of stillness that divides one day from the next.”
     “They have a name for that?” Mamoru asked, raising his eyebrows.  “Seriously?”
     “Ah, my ancestors had names for everything,” Yu shrugged.  “Gave ‘em something to do besides drink and fight.”

—Mark MacKinnon, On A Clear Day You Can See Forever, Ch. 9

(Source: captaindumbmerica)

Filed under music classical benedictus karl jenkins fanfiction quote pivlionta stillness on a clear day you can see forever

103 notes

89 Plays
Dinah Washington and Max Richter
This Bitter Earth

guajirodreams:

This Bitter Earth | Dinah Washington and Max Richter On The Nature Of Daylight

This bitter earth
What fruit it bears
What good is love
That no one shares
And if my life is like the dust
That hides the glow of a rose
What good am I
Heaven only knows

This bitter Earth
Can it be so cold
Today you’re young
Too soon you’re old
But while a voice
Within me cries
I’m sure someone
May answer my call
And this bitter earth
May not be so bitter after all.

Tears…


A gorgeously plaintive mashup of a 1960 Dinah Washington song with a 2004 Max Richter post-classical instrumental for strings.

Filed under music mashup classical dinah washington max richter strings

140 notes

1,345 Plays
Max Richter
On The Nature Of Daylight

2-lives:

Max Richter - On The Nature Of Daylight, 2004


I happened to watch both Shutter Island and Disconnect for the first time in the past few days.  And I’m thankful it made me look up the particular piece of music that was used in both movies.  There’s a universe of feeling contained in these 6 minutes.

Filed under music classical max richter on the nature of daylight strings

7 notes

80 Plays
Maaya Sakamoto
Chiisana Hemisphere

"Little Hemisphere", a nearly a capella version of the RahXephon series opening.  When all I want to hear is Maaya’s voice and some low-key synths, this delivers!

Filed under rahxephon hemisphere Maaya Sakamoto

79 notes


Hitomi Kanzaki (Vision of Escaflowne), Reika Mishima (RahXephon), Mari Ilustre Makinami (Evangelion), Akashi (Yojouhan Shinwa Taikei)…
♥ Maaya Sakamoto

Hitomi Kanzaki (Vision of Escaflowne), Reika Mishima (RahXephon), Mari Ilustre Makinami (Evangelion), Akashi (Yojouhan Shinwa Taikei)…

♥ Maaya Sakamoto

(Source: tsurende)

Filed under Maaya Sakamoto

223,225 notes

ironcheflancaster:

wedonotpromoteviolence:

heirofspacecore:

sleek-black-wings:

thederpywingedone:

batmansymbol:

by the way did I ever tell y’all about the time I got a blank message from nobody, sent on new year’s eve in 1969, when the internet didn’t exist?
because that happened

What the fuck

Time travel.

Or maybe its from 2069, when we’ve developed the technology to send data to the past. You sent yourself a blank message as a test but as the email address you used to send it doesnt exist yet, it came up as no sender

I… what?

OKAY KIDS, LET’S LEARN ABOUT THE UNIX EPOCH
So back in the early days of computers, when we were trying to build clocks to keep all our computers in sync, we tried a bunch of different ways to synchronize them in ways that both normal people could use and programmers could utilize.
We just tried saying “The current time is THIS date” and just storing that date as some text, but while that was easy for humans, it was a bunch of different numbers that worked together in funny ways and computers don’t play nice with a bunch of random, arbitrary rules.
Not much worked, until we realized that we needed a BASELINE to compare against, and a way to represent the current time that covers everybody. So we came up with Unix time, because Unix was the style at the time. Essentially, Unix time represents any given time by saying “How many seconds ago was 12:00 AM on January 1, 1970 in Iceland somewhere?”. Recent enough to keep the numbers relatively small, far enough that nothing computer-y would fall before it, and consistent enough that there’d be no discrepancy based on where you are.
So what happens when you see the date “December 31, 1969” on a buggy message like this is that the computer received a bunch of zeroes by mistake and went “Oh, this must be a message!” Then when it tried to interpret it, it got to the date, found a zero, and said “Zero seconds since the Unix Epoch? I’ll round down - this was sent at the last second of New Year’s Eve, 1969! They’ll be so happy to finally get their blank message.”
And then the computer traipsed off on its merry way, because computers are fucking ridiculous.

ironcheflancaster:

wedonotpromoteviolence:

heirofspacecore:

sleek-black-wings:

thederpywingedone:

batmansymbol:

by the way did I ever tell y’all about the time I got a blank message from nobody, sent on new year’s eve in 1969, when the internet didn’t exist?

because that happened

What the fuck

Time travel.

Or maybe its from 2069, when we’ve developed the technology to send data to the past. You sent yourself a blank message as a test but as the email address you used to send it doesnt exist yet, it came up as no sender

I… what?

OKAY KIDS, LET’S LEARN ABOUT THE UNIX EPOCH

So back in the early days of computers, when we were trying to build clocks to keep all our computers in sync, we tried a bunch of different ways to synchronize them in ways that both normal people could use and programmers could utilize.

We just tried saying “The current time is THIS date” and just storing that date as some text, but while that was easy for humans, it was a bunch of different numbers that worked together in funny ways and computers don’t play nice with a bunch of random, arbitrary rules.

Not much worked, until we realized that we needed a BASELINE to compare against, and a way to represent the current time that covers everybody. So we came up with Unix time, because Unix was the style at the time. Essentially, Unix time represents any given time by saying “How many seconds ago was 12:00 AM on January 1, 1970 in Iceland somewhere?”. Recent enough to keep the numbers relatively small, far enough that nothing computer-y would fall before it, and consistent enough that there’d be no discrepancy based on where you are.

So what happens when you see the date “December 31, 1969” on a buggy message like this is that the computer received a bunch of zeroes by mistake and went “Oh, this must be a message!” Then when it tried to interpret it, it got to the date, found a zero, and said “Zero seconds since the Unix Epoch? I’ll round down - this was sent at the last second of New Year’s Eve, 1969! They’ll be so happy to finally get their blank message.”

And then the computer traipsed off on its merry way, because computers are fucking ridiculous.

(via serenading-solitude)

Filed under computer time unix epoch blank text